Virginia CZM Program Coastal Needs Assessment and Strategies: FY2011-2015


The FY 2011-2015 Virginia Coastal Needs and Strategies document (for projects conducted between October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2016) was reviewed and approved in April 2011 by the Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, NOAA.  For more details on the Coastal Needs Assessment process and strategy development and approval process go to the Main Virginia Coastal Assessment and Strategy Page

'High Priority'Areas, as ranked by the Coastal Policy Team (CPT) following the FY 2010 Virginia CZM Program Coastal Needs Assessment:  

  • special area management plans (SAMPs)
  • ocean resources (marine debris)
  • cumulative and secondary impacts of growth and development (CSI) 

Download Full Report - Virginia 2010 Coastal Needs Assessment and FY 11 - FY 15 Strategies (PDF)

Download sections of the report below:

2010 Assessment Areas:

  • FY 11 - FY 15 Coastal Strategies (pdf) 
    A brief description of each of the strategies, including a list of all projects conducted under the strategy in fiscal years 2011-2018, are provided below.

Special Area Management Plans Strategy and Projects

Seaside SAMP Strategy (pdf)

The Seaside SAMP Strategy proposes to develop, in essence, a Marine Spatial Plan for the Seaside’s barrier island lagoon system. This is an 80 mile long, 1-5 mile wide swath of shallow water that abounds with birds, finfish, shellfish and once again, underwater grasses. The area is renowned for its clam growing industry which is now valued at about $50 million per year. It’s also increasingly recognized for its ecotourism value due to the vast number of birds and other fascinating sights as well as its allure for kayakers.

The program change will require adoption by the Marine Resources Commission of a new approach to leasing state-owned bottom for shellfish cultivation, for providing more suitable areas for public shell fishing and for preserving areas for habitat protection and recreational uses. The current system of hard, immovable boundaries has been in place since the late 1800’s and now that new uses have emerged and suitability of areas for various uses has shifted, we need to adopt a more dynamic, flexible system that can allow use boundaries to shift as the environment changes and human needs and uses change.

Grant projects addressing this strategy:

FY 2011 Projects
96 Accomack-Northampton Planning District Commission  Seaside SAMP: Recreational & Cultural Uses on the Seaside and Adjacent Atlantic Ocean and SAV Restoration Goals
FY 2012 Projects
96 Accomack-Northampton Planning District Commission Seaside SAMP –Recreational & Commercial Fishing Uses on the Seaside and Adjacent Atlantic Ocean and SAV Restoration Goals

Ocean Resources Strategy and Projects

Virginia Marine Spatial Plan and Marine Debris Plan Strategy (pdf)

The Virginia CZM Program will develop a Virginia Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for the waters off Virginia’s coast in concert with the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO) and the 'regional planning body' called for in the July 19, 2010 Final Recommendations of the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force (IOPTF). Details of how the IOPTF’s recommendations and the accompanying Presidential Executive Order are to be implemented are still being determined and may take some time to unfold. Therefore it is difficult to state many specifics for this strategy at this time. As the path forward becomes clear, Virginia will determine critical specifics such as what geographic area will be covered by the plan and exactly what form the 'enforceable policy' will need to take. At a minimum, Virginia’s Marine Spatial Plan will cover the area from mean low water along Virginia’s Atlantic coast out to the 200 mile Exclusive Economic Zone. If time and funding allow, or should it become required, the Virginia portion of Chesapeake Bay will also be included.

In addition this Ocean Resources Strategy will include creation of a Virginia Marine Debris Plan, with an analysis of key marine debris issues and prioritization of these issues. The Plan will be presented to the Virginia Coastal Policy Team and MARCO for adoption. Decreasing marine debris is one of the goals within MARCO’s set of 'Water Quality' goals.

Grant projects addressing this strategy:

FY 2011 Projects
95.01 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Virginia Ocean Spatial Plan
95.02 Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center Foundation Marine Debris Summit
95.03 Longwood University Marine Debris Reduction Plan for Virginia
FY 2012 Projects
95 Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Ocean Plan
95.01 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Interjurisdictional Coordination for Alternatives Assessment for the Northern Seaside of Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Accomack County
FY 2013 Projects
95.01 Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Ocean Plan
95.02 Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center Foundation Offshore Energy Planning: Documenting Location of Megafauna off Virginia’s Coast
FY 2014 Projects
95.01 Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Ocean Plan and Atlantic Sturgeon EMF Study
95.03 Longwood University Virginia Marine Debris Reduction Plan Refinement and Implementation of Balloon Reduction Social Marketing Campaign
95.04 Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center Foundation Offshore Energy Planning: Continued Documentation of Megafauna off Virginia’s Coast Using Aerial Survey
FY 2015 Projects
95.01 Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Ocean Plan
95.02 Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Introductory Materials for update of the Virginia Marine Mammal Conservation Plan
95.03 Longwood University Virginia Marine Debris Reduction Plan Refinement and Implementation of Balloon Reduction Social Marketing Campaign

Cumulative & Secondary Impacts Strategy and Projects

Working Waterfronts Strategy (pdf)

The proposed program change will establish a coastal zone-wide Working Waterfronts plan for Virginia that will serve to guide communities in protecting, restoring and enhancing their water-dependent commercial and recreational activities. The strategy to develop this program change is designed to help communities with existing water-dependent commercial infrastructure understand the long-term costs associated with the loss of working waterfronts, develop new policy tools to help them manage the increasing growth pressures, and build capacity to develop working waterfronts as a thriving component of local economic development.

Grant projects addressing this strategy:

FY 2011 Projects
92 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Developing a Working Waterfronts Plan for Virginia's Coastal Zone
FY 2012 Projects
92 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Developing a Working Waterfronts Plan for Virginia's Coastal Zone
FY 2013 Projects
92 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Developing a Working Waterfronts Plan for Virginia's Coastal Zone - Year 3
FY 2014 Projects
92 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Policy Development for Virginia’s Working Waterfronts Plan
FY 2015 Projects
92 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Virginia Working Waterfronts Master Plan and 2nd Virginia  Working Waterfront Summit

Cumulative & Secondary Impacts Strategy and Projects

Shoreline Management Strategy (pdf)

The previous Section 309 Shoreline Management Strategy provided $791,590 for various initiatives to promote the use of living shorelines. Outcomes included changes to policy documents, state legislation, education of government officials, contractors and waterfront property-owners, and new living shoreline design guidance. Support was also provided for data acquisition to help improve local decision making. This strategy will build on these successes by providing support for development of local shoreline management plans. These plans are widely recognized as the most effective policy to promote living shorelines. In addition, funds in year 1 will be targeted at implementing the recommendations of a study mandated by the Virginia General Assembly to find ways to streamline the regulatory process for living shorelines and promote this method of shoreline management. As a result, the anticipated outcomes of this strategy will be both new policies (in the form of locally adopted plans and changes to state regulations) and implementation of previous program changes from the last strategy.

Grant projects addressing this strategy:

FY 2011 Projects
93.01 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Research and development of comprehensive shoreline guidance and living shorelines general permit in Virginia
93.02 Virginia Institute of Marine Science - Center for Coastal Resources Management Shoreline Management Planning
FY 2012 Projects
93.01 Virginia Institute of Marine Science - Center for Coastal Resources Management Shoreline Management Planning and Development
FY 2013 Projects
93.01 Virginia Institute of Marine Science - Center for Coastal Resources Management Shoreline Management Planning
FY 2014 Projects
93 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Shoreline Management Planning
FY 2015 Projects
93 Virginia Institute of Marine Science Shoreline Management Planning

Cumulative & Secondary Impacts Strategy and Projects

Land and Water Quality Protection Strategy (pdf)

The anticipated program change resulting from this strategy aims toward improved land use approaches and development policies that are consistent with increased nutrient reduction goals proposed by the Chesapeake Bay TMDL, Virginia’s WIP, and revised Virginia storm water management regulations. The strategy will analyze the local consequences of these storm water control requirements across three regional types (urban, transitional and rural) and develop tools to enable localities to meet these requirements while avoiding natural resource impacts or unforeseen patterns of sprawl.

In light of changing Federal and State regulations associated with nutrient loading, local nutrient goals, storm water management and TMDLs, initial grant funds will be offered to two coastal PDCs representing the geographies of urban, suburban and rural areas to evaluate and recommend new policy approaches and solutions for specifically identified local issues relating to water quality. This opportunity offers (as a pilot project) a comprehensive review of the impacts of new legislation and the identification of new policy changes that may be needed to advance sustainable community development in a new regulatory environment.

Identifying and addressing these issues at the regional and local level is the most appropriate way to arrive at locally successful approaches to effective water quality improvements. Also, by initiating the project through a pilot program, one or two coastal regions serve as research and testing grounds, thus allowing other coastal regions and localities to implement resulting policies in later years of the 309 funding cycle.

In addition, the strategy will address other regionally specific issues related to land use and water quality as identified by each participating planning district. For example, the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission has identified interest in exploring the need for legislation to enable localities to require replacement or preservation of trees beyond the existing limits of 10-20 percent tree canopy in order to protect or restore water quality.

Grant projects addressing this strategy:

FY 2011 Projects

94.01

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission Land & Water Quality Protection in Hampton Roads
94.02 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Land & Water Quality Protection in Middle Peninsula
FY 2012 Projects
94.01 Hampton Roads Planning District Commission Land & Water Quality Protection in Hampton Roads
94.02 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Land & Water Quality Protection in Middle Peninsula
FY 2013 Projects
94.01 Hampton Roads Planning District Commission Land & Water Quality Protection in Hampton Roads
94.02 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Land & Water Quality Protection in Middle Peninsula Phase III
FY 2014 Projects
94.01 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Drainage and Roadside Ditching Authority
94.02 Northern Virginia Regional Commission Land and Water Quality Protection Northern Virginia Phase I: Municipal Policies for Managing Stormwater with Green Infrastructure
FY 2015 Projects
94.01 Hampton Roads Planning District Commission Integrating Coastal Resilience into Local Plans, Policies, and Ordinances
94.02 Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission Mathews County Ditch Mapping and Database
94.03 Northern Virginia Regional Commission Northern Virginia Native Plant Social Marketing Campaign (“Plant NoVA Natives”)

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For comments or questions concerning this program's web pages, contact Virginia Witmer.

This website is provided by the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program through a federal Coastal Zone Management Act grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Department of Commerce.

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Virginia Department of
Environmental Quality
P.O. Box 1105
Richmond, VA 23218
(804) 698-4000


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