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Official DEQ news releases.

List administrator(s): Bill Hayden, Jennifer Underwood, Irina Calos, John Tragesser

Virginia to hold public meetings on Soil and Water Conservation Districts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 23, 2013

Contact: Bill Hayden
(804) 698-4447
william.hayden@deq.virginia.gov

RICHMOND, VA. – Virginia is holding a series of public meetings in October and November to evaluate the role of Soil and Water Conservation Districts in providing effective delivery of water quality services and technical assistance.

Seven public meetings will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in locations convenient to the Commonwealth’s six Soil and Water Conservation District areas and one on the Eastern Shore. The locations and dates are:

• Augusta County Government Center, Verona – October 1.
• Henrico County Government Center – October 3.
• Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, Chesapeake – October 8.
• Emory and Henry College, Emory – October 24.
• Culpeper County Reva Fire and Rescue, Culpeper – October 28.
• Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex, Chatham – October 30.
• Eastern Shore Community College, Melfa – November 7.

Under legislation approved by the 2013 General Assembly and signed by Gov. Bob McDonnell, the meetings are being convened by the directors of the Departments of Environmental Quality and Conservation and Recreation; the Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services; members of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources; and members of the House Committee on Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources. Also participating will be representatives of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, agriculture and environmental groups.

Each meeting will include a public comment opportunity, as well as a roundtable discussion on the role that Soil and Water Conservation Districts play in providing assistance in delivery of water quality services for nonpoint source pollution management, and in providing technical assistance for such programs as erosion and sediment control and stormwater management.

Additional information is available on the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services website at www.vdacs.virginia.gov/pdffiles/swcd.pdf.

From: Bill Hayden

Sent: September 23, 2013 at 10:43 am

Virginia to hold public meetings on Soil and Water Conservation Districts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 23, 2013

Contact: Bill Hayden
(804) 698-4447
william.hayden@deq.virginia.gov

RICHMOND, VA. – Virginia is holding a series of public meetings in October and November to evaluate the role of Soil and Water Conservation Districts in providing effective delivery of water quality services and technical assistance.

Seven public meetings will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in locations convenient to the Commonwealth’s six Soil and Water Conservation District areas and one on the Eastern Shore. The locations and dates are:

• Augusta County Government Center, Verona – October 1.
• Henrico County Government Center – October 3.
• Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, Chesapeake – October 8.
• Emory and Henry College, Emory – October 24.
• Culpeper County Reva Fire and Rescue, Culpeper – October 28.
• Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex, Chatham – October 30.
• Eastern Shore Community College, Melfa – November 7.

Under legislation approved by the 2013 General Assembly and signed by Gov. Bob McDonnell, the meetings are being convened by the directors of the Departments of Environmental Quality and Conservation and Recreation; the Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services; members of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources; and members of the House Committee on Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources. Also participating will be representatives of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, agriculture and environmental groups.

Each meeting will include a public comment opportunity, as well as a roundtable discussion on the role that Soil and Water Conservation Districts play in providing assistance in delivery of water quality services for nonpoint source pollution management, and in providing technical assistance for such programs as erosion and sediment control and stormwater management.

Additional information is available on the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services website at www.vdacs.virginia.gov/pdffiles/swcd.pdf.

From: Bill Hayden

Sent: September 23, 2013 at 10:33 am

DEQ assumes responsibility for Virginia stormwater management programs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 1, 2013

Contact: Bill Hayden
(804) 698-4447
william.hayden@deq.virginia.gov

RICHMOND, VA. – Effective July 1, 2013, the Department of Environmental Quality becomes the Commonwealth’s lead agency for managing stormwater and related nonpoint source pollution programs. This follows legislation passed by the 2013 General Assembly that consolidates stormwater programs previously managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation at DEQ.

“These changes bring Virginia’s water quality programs under one roof at DEQ, and will help ensure that local governments, builders and developers, and the public are able to obtain the information they need for effective management of stormwater and nonpoint source pollution,” DEQ Director David K. Paylor said.

Several programs under the stormwater umbrella now will be part of DEQ, or will complement programs already at DEQ. These include:

• Stormwater management permits
• Erosion and sediment control
• Chesapeake Bay preservation
• Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)
• Nonpoint source funding (Clean Water Act Section 319 grants)
• Nonpoint source training and certifications

Nonpoint source pollution is water pollution caused by stormwater runoff that is not confined to a single source, such as a wastewater treatment plant or industrial discharge pipe. One of the main ways of controlling nonpoint source pollution is through stormwater management, which includes erosion and sediment control.

More information is available on the DEQ website at www.deq.virginia.gov.

From: Bill Hayden

Sent: July 01, 2013 at 11:36 am

Virginia issues solid waste report for 2012

RICHMOND, VA. -- The Department of Environmental Quality released its annual report today on solid waste management in Virginia. The report includes the amounts of solid waste managed in Virginia in 2012, and the amounts and sources of solid waste generated outside the Commonwealth.

The total amount of solid waste received at Virginia facilities during 2012 decreased by about 470,000 tons (2.3 percent) from 2011. Solid waste includes municipal solid waste, construction and demolition debris, vegetative and yard waste, and other types of waste. The total amount of solid waste from outside Virginia decreased by about 190,000 tons (3.4 percent) to 5.4 million tons. The total amount from within Virginia decreased to about 14.9 million tons (down 1.9 percent).

Other findings of the report include:

• Of the 20.3 million tons of solid waste reported in 2012, approximately 11.9 million tons (58.9 percent) were municipal solid waste, which is trash from households and businesses.
• The total amount of municipal solid waste generated outside Virginia was approximately 3.7 million tons, a decrease of 4.6 percent. Maryland, New York, Washington, D.C., New Jersey and North Carolina accounted for 97.7 percent of all waste received from out-of-state sources.
• Of the total solid waste reported in 2012, about 4 million tons (19.8 percent) were construction and demolition debris.
• Of the total solid waste managed in Virginia in 2012, about 12.5 million tons (74 percent) were disposed of in landfills, and about 2.2 million tons (12.8 percent) were incinerated. The rest was managed by other means, including mulching and recycling.

The full solid waste report is available on the DEQ website at www.deq.virginia.gov.

From: Bill Hayden

Sent: June 19, 2013 at 11:05 am

Corps of Engineers and Commonwealth of Virginia announce Gathright Dam pulse release dates

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 24, 2013

Contact: Bill Hayden
(804) 698-4447
william.hayden@deq.virginia.gov

Norfolk District Public Affairs
Kerry Solan
(757) 201-7606
kerry.l.solan@usace.army.mil

RICHMOND, VA. – The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will deviate from Gathright Dam’s existing water control plan in order to conduct six pulse releases from June through October 2013.

The pulses, conducted by the Norfolk District in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, will begin at approximately 6 a.m. and end at 2 p.m. and will increase levels 3 to 4.5 feet in the Jackson River.

The agencies advise people who use the river to be aware of the river fluctuations caused by the pulses.

“The pulses will allow for a full season of monitoring data to be collected,” said Owen Reece, Norfolk District hydraulic engineer. “The data will help to document the water quality and environmental benefits of an alternative water control plan.”

The 2013 pulse dates are scheduled for the following Tuesdays:

• June 25
• July 23
• Aug. 13
• Sept. 3
• Sept. 24
• Oct. 15

The deviation from the water control plan will also slightly reduce river flow by 11 percent from the dam, resulting in a 1-inch drop in the Jackson River.

The releases will not have negative effects on the water levels at Lake Moomaw; levels are expected to remain slightly above where they would have been under the existing water control plan. The water reserved in the lake from the reduced flow will be used for the pulse releases.

The pulse releases will be similar to test pulse releases previously conducted in August 2010, September 2011 and October 2012. Those controlled releases, which were single events, tested whether the pulses effectively removed algae and improved water quality.

The 3,000 cubic-feet-per-second test pulse in August 2010 showed the pulse raised dissolved oxygen levels in the river, scoured excess oxygen-consuming algae and “slightly improved” aquatic habitat of the Jackson River downstream of Covington.

"We expect the proposed changes in flow, coupled with major pollutant reductions in the basin, to significantly improve water quality in the Jackson River," DEQ Director David K. Paylor said.

The temporary deviation is based on the preferred alternative in the Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact documents, which were prepared to assess the potential impacts of the Gathright Dam Low Flow Augmentation Project on the Jackson River. The project and development of the preferred alternative were a cooperative effort between the Norfolk District and the Commonwealth of Virginia.

The Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact are available at http://www.nao.usace.army.mil/About/Projects/GathrightMoomaw.aspx.

From: Bill Hayden

Sent: May 24, 2013 at 9:02 am